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Using Makin’ Machine Control to Conquer Norway's Rugged Terrain

Author and photographer: Karina Lykke Lumholt

Øyvind Stavheim, excavator operator at Lesja Bulldozerlag, is using Makin3D on a road building project on the island of Solund in the Norwegian westland.


The west coast of Norway, also known as the "Westland," is characterized by its rugged and dramatic nature. The coast is known for its beautiful fjords, which are deep inlets of the sea surrounded by tall, steep cliffs. The area is also known for its rocky beaches, steep mountains, and glaciers.


The new road project on Solund is part of a bridge project connecting the island with the mainland. Øyvind is right now preparing a pilot road in the very challenging environment on the island. A pilot road is a temporary road that is built as part of a construction project, usually to provide access for construction vehicles and equipment to the site where the permanent road will be built. Pilot roads are typically built in remote or difficult-to-access areas, as is the case here on Solund..


Using the Excavator to Prepare Virgin Terrain

Øyvind uses the excavator to clean the rocky surface from vegetation by using the bucket to scoop up and remove vegetation, such as bushes and small trees, from the rocky surface. Afterwards, the drill rig can take over and prepare for blasting.



Øyvind Stavheim, machine operator at Lesja Bulldozerlag, is using Makin3D.


Working conditions in this remote and rocky area of Norway are challenging but Øyvind is satisfied with the Makin’ system. Connectivity can often be a challenge on a remote island as Solund, but Øyvind finds Makin’s GPS positioning to be surprisingly high-performing.


Øyvind has been using the Makin’ Surfaces function that automatically logs the surface as he is working. The new functionality will make the logging simpler and much more accurate.


Lesja Bulldozerlag uses Makin' Surfaces is on the pilot road project.


Makin’ Machine Control is One of the Reliable Tools Needed for Road Construction in Norway

Building roads in Norway can present several challenges due to the country's rugged and mountainous terrain. Øyvind and his colleagues at Lesja Bulldozerlag need reliable and rugged tools that are designed for harsh conditions. Makin is one of these tools that can create a more productive and safer workday for the machine operators working out there all year round and in the harshest of conditions.


Excavators are preparing the rocky surface.




What are the five main reasons to add machine control to your excavator?


Increased productivity: Makin’ machine control systems can help operators work more efficiently by providing real-time guidance and feedback on digging depth and slope.



Improved accuracy: Makin’ machine control systems use GPS or total station technology to accurately position the excavator bucket, which can help reduce the need for rework and increase the precision of the finished product.



Fewer mistakes and less rework: Makin’ machine control systems can help reduce the physical demands on operators by automating certain tasks and providing real-time guidance.



Increased safety: Makin’ machine control systems can help increase safety on the job site by providing real-time guidance and feedback to operators, and by helping to prevent collisions and other accidents.



Better data collection: With Makin’ Surfaces machine control systems can now automatically collect a wide range of data, which can be used to improve overall project management and cost control.

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